Top Tips for IELTS

Describe your favourite room

This is another of my sample answers to IELTS part 2 speaking questions. You’ll find here

suggestions on how to structure your answer

highlighted words and phrases to describe rooms

Cue card question

A room

Describe your favourite room

You should say

what the room is

what furniture it contains

what you do in it

And explain why it is your favourite room

Read my model answer

Brief introduction

I’m going to talk to you about my bedroom. It’s probably the favourite room in the house where I live or at least it’s the place where I spend most of my time.

What the room is

While I say it’s my bedroom, it’s actually more like a bedsit in that it’s not just a place where I sleep. Because I’m still studying I also use the room as my study too. It’s not exactly a large room but it’s spacious enough and there’s room for all my things – books etc

How it is furnished

It’s fairly lightly furnished because I’m living in rented accommodation and the only furniture there came with the room. There’s a bed and a wardrobe as you would expect but there’s also a smallish desk in the corner where I have my computer and printer. I spend quite a lot of time doing my assignments for college there but I also use my bed as a kind of couch or settee when I just want to read.

What I do there and why I like it

I share the house with a number of students and so there isn’t much privacy. It’s nice to have other people about and I wouldn’t want to live by myself. But there are times when I want to be in a quiet place and concentrate on my work and that’s when I tend to go up to my room and study. If I’m in the mood for company I’ll go back downstairs to the communal living room and watch tv with one of my housemates. There’s almost always someone around. So I think  get the best of both worlds.

Now Listen


Understand how to structure an answer

Follow the cue card – use speaking paragraphs

One way to answer a part 2 question is to structure your answer into “paragraphs” by following the points on the cue card. This helps you keep on speaking by pausing in appropriate places.The pattern is:

You say something

Expand it a little

Perhaps summarise it

Move on

Give mini introductions – show your structure

If you look at my example below you’ll see that each time I move onto a new topic I give a small introduction to show the examiner what I’m doing. This has two benefits:

it helps the examiner see that you’re being coherent – that’s a large part of your score

it helps you focus on what you’re going to say next – it just makes speaking easier

See the examples

You should see from these examples that I typically start off with a  short simple sentence that fairly directly answers the point on the cue card. The exception is that final paragraph where I combine two ideas – what I do there and why I like it. Note that this is the final part of my talk and I only do this once I have been speaking for a while. I already have the rhythm.

I’m going to talk to you about my bedroom.

While I say it’s my bedroom, it’s actually more like a bedsit in that it’s not just a place where I sleep

It’s fairly lightly furnished because I’m living in rented accommodation

I share the house with a number of students and so there isn’t much privacy.. It’s nice to have other people about and I wouldn’t want to live by myself. But there are times when I want to be in a quiet place and concentrate on my work and that’s when I tend to go up to my room and study

 

Get more cue cards and model answers

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